The Tribunal’s enforcer

In Octagon Overseas Ltd and Canary Riverside Management Ltd v Coates [2017] EWHC 877 (Ch), the First-tier Tribunal appointed Mr Coates as the manager of Canary Riverside (a development comprising, amongst other things, four blocks of residential apartments of which Octagon were the freehold owners) under s.24, Landlord and Tenant Act 1987. As part of […]

Repairing the caselaw on disrepair

I don’t think it is unfair to say that disrepair is not always viewed with great enthuiasm by practioners of housing law. So, I am going to plead with you all to stick with this post of mine even though on reflection it is far longer than I would have liked. It concerns a very […]

Grants and service charges

This is a very short note (come on its a Friday afternoon) on the recent Upper Tribunal case Oliver v Sheffield City Council [2015] UKUT 229 (LC), 21 May 2015. This was a case concerning a dispute about the payment of a service charge that arose from works carried out by Sheffield City Council on […]

Is there a maximum award for general damages arising under contract?

The case of Rendlesham Estates Plc v Barr Ltd [2014] EWHC 3968 (TCC) is a bit off the housing law beaten track and as a result I have only recently got round to reading it properly. It concerned s.1, Defective Premises Act 1974, which is the statutory provision that enables any person with an interest […]

Former relevant children who aren’t former relevant children

This is a quick note on a quite important case concerning duties owed to young people who are over 18 and who should have been, but in fact were not, provided with accommodation under s.20, Children Act 1989 prior to their 18th birthday. You may recall in R (M) v Hammersmith LBC [2008] UKHL 14, […]

Paragraph 71

One of life’s great pleasures is watching a good film with Bill Nighy in it. One of my recent favourites is a film called Page Eight. A housing law blog isn’t really the time or the place to review the film (you have the link to imdb if interested), but there is a cracking line […]

The public sector equality duty and priority need

We are (or more accurately I am) a bit late on this one. It is quite important though and the fact I have only just written it up should not detract from that. In Kanu v Southwark LBC [2014] EWCA Civ 1085, the Court of Appeal considered whether the public sector equality duty added an […]

You’ve got absoutely nothing out of this

For most parties that enter into litigation (save for those on CFAs and some who are legally aided) a win isn’t really a win unless the other side is also ordered to pay your costs. I say most, because certain litigants enter into litigation knowing that come what May their costs will be paid on […]

This is what we always meant

Regular readers of this blog (when it is accessible) will know that we are a housing law blog. However, housing law (for the most part) is covered by the overarching umbrella of civil law and we do therefore occasionally cover the odd important non-housing civil law development. It is for that reason that we have […]